Speaking of Sex with Suzanne Iasenza: 4-Part Series

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A 4-part series led by Suzanne Iasenza

Suzanne Iasenza will moderate this 4-part Speaking of Sex series. In addition to hosting her own webinar on Integrating Sex Therapy into Couple Therapy, Suzanne will also moderate sessions in this series by Margaret Nichols, Michael Bader and Kathryn Hall.

Register for 1 webinar or the entire series. Register for 4 for the price of 3.
Registration rate: 1 for $139.00 or all for $417

Can’t Attend Live? These webinars will be recorded and archived. All registrants will be given unlimited access to the recording for a full year after the Live Broadcast date.

PART 1:

Transforming Sexual Narratives: Integrating Sex Therapy into Couple Therapy

This is an on-demand webinar. Register for this series and this webinar with handouts and CE information will be sent to you shortly.

The presentation was broadcast live on Thursday, September 24th, 2021.

This is the first of the Speaking of Sex series.

Sex therapy has been a focus for Dr. Iasenza for many years. Her approach helps therapists guide clients facing intimacy challenges by identifying and rewriting conscious and unconscious negative sexual narratives. As a result, clients can reclaim intimacy in their erotic lives.

Dr. Iasenza integrates psychodynamic systems and cognitive behavioural sex therapy techniques to identify relationships between personal, social, cultural and familial sexual narratives.

In this webinar on sex therapy, you will explore how to expand restrictive models of sexual response and how to conduct a relational sexual history. You will also learn how to help clients expand their sexual repertoire.

Case material will illustrate how to integrate this approach to sexual therapy into general couple psychotherapy.

PART 2:

Working With Sex, Gender, And Relationship Diverse Clients

This is an on-demand webinar. Register for this series and this webinar with handouts and CE information will be sent to you shortly.

The presentation was broadcast live on Friday, October 15, 2021

This is part of the Speaking of Sex series.

LGBTQ+ has become one of today’s most popular acronyms. The latest Gallup Poll finds that 5.6% of Americans overall—including one in six Gen Z people—identify as LGBT. Furthermore, 4% of adults are in open relationships engaging in consensual non-monogamy. And nearly half of adults are involved in some form of ‘kinky’ sex (BDSM) with many more fantasizing about it. In addition, 1% of the population identifies as ‘asexual’.

The typical graduate school experience may touch upon lesbian and gay people, but other ‘non-normative’ populations are rarely discussed. Nor are they framed in pathologizing terms.

In this workshop, we assume that sex/gender/relationship diversity is normal. You will learn about all types of LGBTQ+ clients and how their sexuality and relationship styles differ from heteronormative standards. We will discuss how these different populations came to be viewed as part of the LGBTQ+ community and what they have in common.

After this webinar, you will understand how to approach LGBTQ+ clients respectfully, how to help them, how to find resources, and when to refer to someone with more expertise. You will leave with expanded knowledge about populations that grad school didn’t prepare you for!

PART 3:

Sexual Fantasies: Understanding Their Meaning in Psychotherapy

This is an on-demand webinar. Register for this series and this webinar with handouts and CE information will be sent to you shortly.

The presentation was broadcast live on Wednesday, November 10, 2021

This is part of the Speaking of Sex series.

Sexual fantasies can provide clinicians with a window into the workings of the mind. In this webinar, we’ll use a psychoanalytical theoretical model developed by Joseph Weiss, M.D. and the San Francisco Psychotherapy Research Group. We’ll use this model to explore various ways sexual fantasies are constructed by minds that are singularly committed to safety.

Sexual excitement is inhibited by certain pathogenic beliefs connected to feelings of guilt, shame, and helplessness. Sexual fantasies enable us to disconfirm these beliefs and, as a result, safely allow sexual arousal to emerge.

Therapists can use the details of a patient’s sexual fantasies to infer a great deal about their core pathogenic beliefs. Together, we will delve into and analyze a range of sexual fantasies from ordinary to bizarre. These include sadomasochistic scenarios, exhibitionistic fantasies, and group sex fantasies.

PART 4:

Dealing with Sexual Issues: What Every Therapist Needs to Know and Shouldn’t Be Afraid to Ask

This is an On Demand Webinar. Access information, resources and CEU information will be sent to you shortly after registration and registrants will be given unlimited access to the recording for a full year.

This webinar was broadcasted live on Tuesday, November 16, 2021

Sexuality is so intricately linked to all other aspects of a person’s life that its separation from the treatment of a person’s psychological distress or relationship issues defies logic. The exclusion of sexuality often reflects discomfort or inexperience on the part of the therapist rather than an informed clinical decision. Indeed, the designation of “sex therapy” as a specialty may have discouraged therapists from incorporating inquiry and interventions regarding sexuality into their treatment practice. And while, in the past, patients and clients may have felt reluctant to talk about sex or explore their sexual issues in general therapy, this is no longer the case. 

The interventions that form the core of sex therapy are in fact those that are integral to all forms of successful psychotherapy. Building upon a strong therapeutic alliance, therapists help clients confront their anxieties and fears, challenge their avoidance behaviors, and build healthier relationships. What is unique about sex therapy is that both the treatment goals and methods are sexual. 

Using clinical case material involving both individuals and couples, participants will learn how to inquire about sexuality throughout the therapeutic process. While information about patients’ sexuality does not equate with a need for intervention, participants will learn if, when, how, and most importantly, why to incorporate sexuality into the goals and process of ongoing psychotherapy. 

Event Detail

November 16, 2021 1:00 pm
November 16, 2021 4:15 pm